2017 Hall of Fame Mock Ballot

This time of year is always fun as the “does he or doesn’t he belong” in the Hall of Fame and “why or why not” chatter starts.  For years I have taken the stance that known PED users do not get in for me.  Lucky for them, I don’t have an actual vote.

Rarely am I swayed once my mind is made up, but it has happened with Tim Raines, so it may still happen for the PED guys.  It doesn’t help their cause, though, that many of them are also known as “bad character” guys which is a criteria considered by the writers.  Only time will tell if they get in, but chances are that they have their fates determined where Mark McGwire’s has ended up – with the Expansion Era Committee.

Without further delay, here is my mock HOF ballot for 2017:

My Ballot

Jeff Bagwell – it’s a crime that he isn’t in already, but he was close last year and hopefully gets over the top this year.

Tim Raines – still a more borderline case than all the Sabr-types want to believe, but they have swayed me on Raines.

Trevor Hoffman – had a strong first showing on last year’s ballot.  Yes, saves have been greatly de-valued since Trevor retired, but his career even outside the saves warrant inclusion.  He had a HOF entrance, as well.

Edgar Martinez – DH is still a position, correct?  And Edgar Martinez is the best DH to ever play, correct?  Then why isn’t he in?  Not to mention his .418 career OBP and 147 OPS+.

Lee Smith – one of the most dominant relievers of his era, saves be damned!

Fred McGriff – do the writers really care about seven home runs?  It appears that they do.  Either that or the Crime Dog was greatly overshadowed by the PED guys on the same era.

Billy Wagner – compelling cases were made for Wagner last year when comparing him against Hoffman.  And, like Smith was dominant in his day, Wagner was, as well.  He deserves to be in Cooperstown.

Vladimir Guerrero – Vlady had an incredible career and cannon in right field.  If you compare his career against McGriff, you’ll see that they are strikingly similar.  It will be interesting to see how their vote totals stack up.

Still deciding

Mike Mussina – Mussina is a curious case.  On one hand, you have wins being de-valued which makes his 270 somewhat less significant, but then you also have those same people saying his ERA is too-high.  Do you like traditional stats or not?  He was durable and a workhorse, no doubt, but was he dominant?  And if so, was he dominant for a long-enough period?  These are the hang-ups with Mussina.

Ivan Rodriguez – there are some strong signs that point to Pudge as a PED guy, but no hard evidence.  Still, what is out there is what also first surrounded the known users.  He is a tough call for me.  No doubt, one of the top 5, maybe 3 all-around catchers in history.

Who gets in this year

My best guess is that we get a two-player class in ’17 with Jeff Bagwell and Tim Raines finally breaking through.  Trevor Hoffman pulls a Craig Biggio and ends up just a couple votes shy of induction this year, paving his way for 2018.

As first-timers, Vladimir Guerrero and Ivan Rodriguez stand the best chance, however, the PED suspicions on Rodriguez may hamper his vote total.  Guerrero, meanwhile, may track in the 40-45% range in votes.

Borderline newcomers to stay on the ballot (5% of vote)

Jorge Posada – should clear at least 10%
Magglio Ordonez – nice career, but not quite as good as Guerrero or even Larry Walker
Edgar Renteria

Who falls off the ballot

Sammy Sosa
Mike Cameron
JD Drew
Derrek Lee
Tim Wakefield
Melvin Mora
Carlos Guillen
Casey Blake
Jason Varitek
Orlando Cabrera
Pat Burrell
Freddy Sanchez
Arthur Rhodes
Matt Stairs

*Raines will fall off if he doesn’t get elected

Top 10 Right Now – First Basemen

This is the fifth in a series of fourteen installments published each Monday leading up to pitchers and catchers reporting in February. The lists will highlight the Top 10 players at each position, managers and executives, finishing up with the Ultimate Top 10 list, a ranking of each of the position’s number one player.

Here’s a list of what’s to come and when:
Dec. 12 – Center Fielders
Dec. 19 – Relief Pitchers
Dec. 26 – Third Basemen
Jan. 2 – Right Fielders
Jan. 9 – Shortstops
Jan. 16 – Starting Pitchers
Jan. 23 – Managers
Jan. 30 – Executives (GM’s/Presidents)
Feb. 6 – Ultimate Top 10
(check previous posts for what’s already been revealed)

Below are two lists, one (“Statistical”) shows players ranked per a combination of their 2016 stats and where they ranked in those stats per their respective position. Offensive, defensive, baserunning and all-inclusive stats are included in the calculations.  The second (“Adjusted”) list is based on stats but then given adjustments based on track record, injuries and projections and reflects our ranking of the players as they head into 2017.

The list in which the players appear depends mostly on where they played the most games (or innings) in 2016 but also where they project to play this coming year if substantially different than last (i.e. role player getting a more permanent position).

2016 Statistical Top 10
10. Chris Carter
9. Hanley Ramirez
8. Chris Davis
7. Wil Myers
6. Brandon Belt
5. Joey Votto
4. Paul Goldschmidt
3. Miguel Cabrera
2. Anthony Rizzo
1. Freddie Freeman

Adjusted Top 10
10. Hanley Ramirez
9. Brandon Belt
8. Jose Abreu
7. Chris Davis
6. Wil Myers
5. Joey Votto
4. Miguel Cabrera
3. Freddie Freeman
2. Anthony Rizzo
1. Paul Goldschmidt

In consideration (in no particular order): Carter, Steve Pearce, Mitch Moreland, CJ Cron, Adrian Gonzalez, Mike Napoli, Eric Hosmer, Justin Bour

Notes: 1-5 and 6-9 are all very close to each other, could go any number of ways… Myers blossomed and can still add patience and discipline to his approach… counting on bounceback from Abreu… I’m as surprised as you are that Hanley stuck in the Top 10 (although Bour, Hosmer and Moreland – if he ends up in Colorado – could change that)… Cabrera’s offense still keeps him a Top 5 1B (although his defense ranked fine among other 1B, too)… Bour might still have more to show… Hosmer’s 2016 rated the same as Ryan Howard and John Jaso, so…

Top 10 Right Now – Designated Hitters

This is the fourth in a series of fourteen installments published each Monday leading up to pitchers and catchers reporting in February. The lists will highlight the Top 10 players at each position, managers and executives, finishing up with the Ultimate Top 10 list, a ranking of each of the position’s number one player.

Here’s a list of what’s to come and when:
Dec. 5 – First Basemen
Dec. 12 – Center Fielders
Dec. 19 – Relief Pitchers
Dec. 26 – Third Basemen
Jan. 2 – Right Fielders
Jan. 9 – Shortstops
Jan. 16 – Starting Pitchers
Jan. 23 – Managers
Jan. 30 – Executives (GM’s/Presidents)
Feb. 6 – Ultimate Top 10
(check previous posts for what’s already been revealed)

Below are two lists, one (“Statistical”) shows players ranked per a combination of their 2016 stats and where they ranked in those stats per their respective position. Offensive, baserunning and all-inclusive stats are included in the calculations.  The second (“Adjusted”) list is based on stats but then given adjustments based on track record, injuries and projections and reflects our ranking of the players as they head into 2017.

2016 Statistical Top 10
10. Avisail Garcia
9. Evan Gattis
T-7. Pedro Alvarez
T-7. Albert Pujols
6. Kendrys Morales
5. Victor Martinez
4. Carlos Beltran
3. Carlos Santana
T-1. Nelson Cruz
T-1.  Edwin Encarnacion

Adjusted Top 10
10. Byung-ho Park
9. Pedro Alvarez
8. Evan Gattis
7. Albert Pujols
6. Victor Martinez
5. Kendrys Morales
4. Carlos Beltran
3. Carlos Santana
2. Nelson Cruz
1. Edwin Encarnacion

In consideration (in no particular order): Garcia, Billy Butler, Preston Tucker, Kennys Vargas, Justin Morneau

Notes: With only 15 teams, “full-time” DH’s (for our purposes, 200 PA or more) are hard to come by… graduated three DH’s in 2016 – David Ortiz, Alex Rodriguez, Prince Fielder… Encarnacion gets the nod due to being a little younger than Cruz, VMart falls to Morales for the same reason… complete Hail Mary on Park at 10, but feel like he should have more in the bat even at age 30/31

Re-Making The White Sox

Last year we had fun re-making the Padres.  This year we’ll take a look at the White Sox since all signs point to rebuild on the South Side.

Unlike with the Padres scenario who needed prospects at the time, for the Sox we are going to focus on ready or near-ready talent for the major league team so the rebuild process is much less painful.

The concept is pretty easy – propose trades that work for not only the Sox, but their trade partners as well. Of course, it’s nearly impossible to nail an exact trade (although we’ve come close in the past), but with the Padres edition last year, many of the names included in our proposed trades have since ended up moving including: James Shields, Billy McKinney, Matt Kemp, Craig Kimbrel, Mark Appel (Houston did get it’s closer for Appel+) and Andrew Cashner (while not traded there as predicted, Texas did just sign him).

As you can see, we’re not too shabby at predicting future movement, sometimes nailing exact trade scenarios/landing spots.

So what can the White Sox do?  Let’s re-make them in one busy offseason:

Red Sox Receive
Chris Sale
David Robertson

White Sox Receive
Yoan Moncada
Andrew Benintendi
Blake Swihart
Eduardo Rodriguez
Michael Kopech

No doubt Sale with the Red Sox and that offense would make them one of the early favorites to win the World Series.  They have the depth to be able to part with not only the minor league guys, but also the Major Leaguers.  It also gives them another bullpen weapon that they need behind Craig Kimbrel.

Nationals Receive
Jose Abreu

White Sox Receive
Lucas Giolito

The Nationals may need to kick in more to land a player of Abreu’s caliber, but the top pitching prospect in the game is a good start.  Giving up Giolito still leaves Washington with other highly-regarded young pitchers Joe Ross and Reynaldo Lopez.  This clearly spells the end of the once face of the franchise, Ryan Zimmerman.  They’ll either have to find a taker for him, release him (doubtful) or have him serve as an important bat off the bench.

Dodgers Receive
Todd Frazier
Brett Lowrie
Zack Burdi

White Sox Receive
Joc Pederson
Jose De Leon
Yimi Garcia

This solves the Dodgers’ problems at third and second and opens up the outfield for some combination of Andre Ethier, Scott Van Slyke, Trayce Thompson, Yasiel Puig, Kike Hernandez and Andrew Toles.  The Sox kick in a pitching prospect to help offset the big package they receive in return.

Cardinals Receive
Adam Eaton

White Sox Receive
Stephen Piscotty

A swap of outfielders, it gives the Cards a center-fielder with high on-base abilities and Chicago a power hitting corner outfielder who’s still getting better.

Astros Receive
Jose Quintana
Nate Jones

White Sox Receive
AJ Reed
Francis Martes
Alex Bregman

Astros land an upgrade for their rotation and bullpen and free up first base for either Tyler White or Yuliesky Gurriel. If Bregman is absolutely untouchable, remove Jones from the deal and replace Bregman with Colin Moran.

Potential 2017 White Sox

Lineup
1.) Andrew Benintendi – LF
2.) Alex Bregman – SS
3.) Stephen Piscotty – RF
4.) Joc Pederson – CF
5.) AJ Reed – 1B
6.) Yoan Moncada – 3B
7.) Melky Cabrera/Avi Garcia/Matt Davidson – DH
8.) Blake Swihart – C
9.) Tim Anderson – 2B

Rotation Options
Carlos Rodon
Lucas Giolito
Eduardo Rodriguez
Shields (sorry, tough to trade him right now)
Carson Fulmer (although, we’ve projected him as a reliever at best)
Jose De Leon
Miguel Gonzalez

How does that team look going forward, White Sox fans? You’re welcome.

Top 10 Right Now – Second Basemen

This is the third in a series of fourteen installments published each Monday leading up to pitchers and catchers reporting in February. The lists will highlight the Top 10 players at each position, managers and executives, finishing up with the Ultimate Top 10 list, a ranking of each of the position’s number one player.

Here’s a list of what’s to come and when:
Nov. 28 – Designated Hitters
Dec. 5 – First Basemen
Dec. 12 – Center Fielders
Dec. 19 – Relief Pitchers
Dec. 26 – Third Basemen
Jan. 2 – Right Fielders
Jan. 9 – Shortstops
Jan. 16 – Starting Pitchers
Jan. 23 – Managers
Jan. 30 – Executives (GM’s/Presidents)
Feb. 6 – Ultimate Top 10
(check previous posts for what’s already been revealed)

Below are two lists, one (“Statistical”) shows players ranked per a combination of their 2016 stats and where they ranked in those stats per their respective position. Offensive, defensive, baserunning and all-inclusive stats are included in the calculations.  The second (“Adjusted”) list is based on stats but then given adjustments based on track record, injuries and projections and reflects our ranking of the players as they head into 2017.

The list in which the players appear depends mostly on where they played the most games (or innings) in 2016 but also where they project to play this coming year if substantially different than last (i.e. role player getting a more permanent position).

2016 Statistical Top 10
10. DJ LeMahieu
9. Jean Segura
8. Cesar Hernandez
7. Jason Kipnis
6. Dustin Pedroia
5. Ian Kinsler
4. Daniel Murphy
3. Robinson Cano
2. Jose Altuve
1. Brian Dozier

Adjusted Top 10
10. Javier Baez
9. DJ LeMahieu
8. Joe Panik
7. Ian Kinsler
6. Jason Kipnis
5. Dustin Pedroia
4. Brian Dozier
3. Daniel Murphy
2. Robinson Cano
1. Jose Altuve

In consideration (in no particular order): Segura, Hernandez, Jonathan Schoop, Neil Walker, Javier Baez, Ben Zobrist, Rougned Odor, Ryan Schimpf

Notes: I buy into Hernandez being real, barely misses our Top 10… Kinsler, Kipnis, Pedroia seem interchangeable; I’ve been waiting for Jason Kipnis to fully breakout (I think there’s still more in there), maybe ’17 is the year… Panik is on the verge of putting it all together… after having correctly predicted the breakouts of Walker, Logan Forsythe and Jedd Gyorko (yes, I saw the power coming) in recent years, my next wave is Panik, Baez and Devon Travis… Because of the emergence Baez, Zobrist will be vying for a different list next year… Ryan Schimpf is legit but probably putting up full season numbers that resemble what he did in half a season in ’16… also correctly predicted that Josh Harrison would fall off the season that he did (granted, a bit of a rebound last year) and wonder if that’s also the fate of Dee Gordon; would like to see him do it clean before I buy he’s good… Schoop probably is what he is now, not much more upside to come

Top 10 Right Now – Catchers

This is the second in a series of fourteen installments published each Monday leading up to pitchers and catchers reporting in February. The lists will highlight the Top 10 players at each position, managers and executives, finishing up with the Ultimate Top 10 list, a ranking of each of the position’s number one player.

Here’s a list of what’s to come and when:
Nov. 21 – Second Basemen
Nov. 28 – Designated Hitters
Dec. 5 – First Basemen
Dec. 12 – Center Fielders
Dec. 19 – Relief Pitchers
Dec. 26 – Third Basemen
Jan. 2 – Right Fielders
Jan. 9 – Shortstops
Jan. 16 – Starting Pitchers
Jan. 23 – Managers
Jan. 30 – Executives (GM’s/Presidents)
Feb. 6 – Ultimate Top 10
(check previous posts for what’s already been revealed)

Below are two lists, one (“Statistical”) shows players ranked per a combination of their 2016 stats and where they ranked in those stats per their respective position. Offensive, defensive, baserunning and all-inclusive stats are included in the calculations.  The second (“Adjusted”) list is based on stats but then given adjustments based on track record, injuries and projections and reflects our ranking of the players as they head into 2017.

The list in which the players appear depends mostly on where they played the most games (or innings) in 2016 but also where they project to play this coming year if substantially different than last (i.e. role player getting a more permanent position).

2016 Statistical Top 10
10. Willson Contreras
9. Wellington Castillo
8. Salvador Perez
7. Sandy Leon
6. Yadier Molina
5. JT Realmuto
4. Yasmani Grandal
3. Wilson Ramos
2. Jonathan Lucroy
1. Buster Posey

Adjusted Top 10
10. Gary Sanchez
9. Russell Martin
8. Salvador Perez
7. Wilson Ramos
6. Yadier Molina
5. JT Realmuto
4. Willson Contreras
3. Yasmani Grandal
2. Jonathan Lucroy
1. Buster Posey

In consideration (in no particular order): Castillo, Matt Wieters, Brian McCann, Yan Gomes, Stephen Vogt, Francisco Cervelli, Derek Norris, Tyler Flowers, Travis d’Arnaud

Notes: Contreras had a big year for missing as much time at the beginning of the year/platooning as he did; looks like the real deal, although appears a candidate for soph. slump… Ramos finds his way down our list due to injury, otherwise might be #4 or 5… banking on a bounce back from Martin… if Sanchez sticks behind the plate he should be on this list for years to come… don’t buy the breakout from Leon

Top 10 Right Now – Left Fielders

This is the first in a series of fourteen installments published each Monday leading up to pitchers and catchers reporting in February. The lists will highlight the Top 10 players at each position, managers and executives, finishing up with the Ultimate Top 10 list, a ranking of each of the position’s number one player.

Here’s a list of what’s to come and when:
Nov. 14 – Catchers
Nov. 21 – Second Basemen
Nov. 28 – Designated Hitters
Dec. 5 – First Basemen
Dec. 12 – Center Fielders
Dec. 19 – Relief Pitchers
Dec. 26 – Third Basemen
Jan. 2 – Right Fielders
Jan. 9 – Shortstops
Jan. 16 – Starting Pitchers
Jan. 23 – Managers
Jan. 30 – Executives (GM’s/Presidents)
Feb. 6 – Ultimate Top 10

Below are two lists, one (“Statistical”) shows players ranked per a combination of their 2016 stats and where they ranked in those stats per their respective position. Offensive, defensive, baserunning and all-inclusive stats are included in the calculations.  The second (“Adjusted”) list is based on stats but then given adjustments based on track record, injuries and projections and reflects our ranking of the players as they head into 2017.

The list in which the players appear depends mostly on where they played the most games (or innings) in 2016 but also where they project to play this coming year if substantially different than last (i.e. role player getting a more permanent position).

2016 Statistical Top 10
10. Justin Upton
9. Melky Cabrera
8. Michael Saunders
7. Brett Gardner
6. Yoenis Cespedes
5. Khris Davis
4. Ryan Braun
3. Adam Duvall
2. Starling Marte
1. Christian Yelich

Adjusted Top 10
10. Michael Saunders
9. Adam Duvall
8. Khris Davis
7. Brett Gardner
6. Justin Upton
5. Kyle Schwarber
4. Yoenis Cespedes
3. Ryan Braun
2. Christian Yelich
1. Starling Marte

In consideration (in no particular order): Cabrera, Matt Kemp, Alex Gordon, Jayson Werth, Michael Conforto

Notes: Very thin position… Yelich and Marte are very close, but Marte retains top spot… Betting on just a down year by Upton and not a trend, bounce back candidate in 2017… As of writing, Schwarber is penciled in at LF next season… Brett Gardner’s overall abilities edge out the power of Duvall and Davis (although Duvall’s defense graded out well in ’16)… Although Ben Zobrist began playing more in left field later in the year, his overall innings favor second base so he was not considered for the LF list this year (plus his position is up in the air for ’17 with the presence of Javy Baez and Schwarber)… Terrance Gore had an interesting year (11 steals without recording a hit, walk or hit by pitch)… Hyun Soo Kim, Jorge Soler, Conforto and maybe even Brandon Drury could make pushes to make the list next season… Can Matt Kemp return to form as he’s alluded to?

2016 Review and Postseason Predictions

There it goes, another season going by much too quickly.  It seems like just yesterday that I was making these preseason predictions.  Speaking of those predictions, let’s take a look at the outcomes.

Overall, it was quite accurate (and when you’re building a readership, accuracy definitely helps in credibility), especially how many of these guesstimates usually turn out whether national media or small-time blog.  At the beginning of the season, I developed and used a proprietary methodology to predict team outcomes.  Seeing the positive results from it, expect more of the same going forward.

That said, while it may work for the regular season (although one year of positive results hardly proves it’s sure-fire), the postseason is a whole different animal with many different variables that are very hard to capture.  But, I’ll certainly try.

First, let’s recap the preseason predictions.

The Good

In the National League, I correctly had the top two teams in each division.  Oddly enough, however, each were opposite of how they finished 1st and 2nd.  Beyond the first two in the central, I had the finishing order 3 through 5 correct with Pittsburgh, Milwaukee and Cincinnati.

I had four of the five – Cubs, Mets, Nationals, Giants – playoff teams correct.

Moving over to the American League, having Baltimore finish 2nd and Cleveland finish 1st were among the best predictions of the preseason as I did not see another outlet with either team finishing as high.  In fact, Cleveland finished within two wins of the prediction.  The Yankees, Rays and Mariners also ended the year within one game of the record I pegged them at and Detroit within two games.  Houston finished with the identical record.

Speaking of Houston, they were among the teams I had finishing below their nationwide expectations along with Minnesota and LA.  Remember, the Twins last year surprised many which led them into being widely predicted as a contender this year.  I had them in last place at 68-94 according to my methodology.

Also, the Pirates were clearly not going to have their best season. Next year may be a whole different scenario, however, with the top three young arms they’ll have in the rotation.

The Angels, like the Twins, were thought to be in for a much better year than they had, but my results showed otherwise and proved correct as they completed the year with a poor 74-88 record.  Other than the bottom two (where I had Oakland finishing fourth), my AL West was quite accurate.

I had three of the five – Indians, Blue Jays, Rangers –  playoff teams in the AL, narrowly missing Detroit who were eliminated on the final day of the season.

Both of my World Series picks for 2016 have made the playoffs, but will they still be my picks now?

The Bad

Of course, it wouldn’t be fair to point out all the positives without also rehashing the forecasts that were missed including the Phillies.  Sure, they were still fairly bad, but not nearly as bad as I had thought (101 losses).  That said, I can see the next wave brewing and if not next season, then 2018 they should be back competing again.

I also missed on Oakland and Arizona.  In Oakland, I had them at near the bottom of the division, however, in record as closer to a .500 team.  They proved otherwise.  Like many, I saw great things for Arizona (87-75), although still had them finishing third in the NL West and missing the playoffs.

Perhaps, though, my biggest oversight was the Boston Red Sox.  They won the division while I had them at 80-82, good for a fourth place AL East finish.  That came largely because of the offense (remember they had Hanley Ramirez coming off a bad year and Pable Sandoval at third when these predictions were made).  Plus, who could have seen Big Papi having the single best year anyone his age has ever produced or Jackie Bradley’s impressive breakout.  To be honest, I also didn’t believe in Mookie Betts.  Call me nuts, but I’d still like to see him do it one more year before I’m totally on board.  The Sox’s pitching was also a question mark beyond David Price heading into the year.  Breakouts by Rick Porcello and Steven Wright helped guide them to the first place finish I didn’t see coming.

The Postseason

It’s time now to attempt to predict the wild-west that is baseball’s postseason.  To start the year I had Cleveland defeating San Francisco in the World Series.  Two major starting pitching injuries (Indians) and an imploding bullpen (Giants) make that seem difficult even with both of those teams in the playoffs.

Here’s how I see it playing out:

Wild Card Games:
Baltimore def. Toronto
San Francisco def. New York

Division Series:
Texas def. Baltimore
Boston def. Cleveland
Chicago def. San Francisco
Los Angeles def. Washington

Championship Series:
Boston def. Texas
Chicago def. Los Angeles

World Series:
Chicago def. Boston

So there it is. This is not only the World Series I think will happen based on the dominance of the teams but also the World Series I’d like to see happen. Fenway and Wrigley in the national spotlight of October baseball, not to mention the Cubs’ vast championship drought? Sign me up.

I almost wrote Texas to defeat Boston in the CS, but Boston’s offense is so strong. In this postseason I’m going against the norm and saying it’ll be the offenses (Boston, Chicago – even thought the Cubs’ pitching is also incredible) over the pitching (Texas, Los Angeles).

I also initially wrote the Red Sox beating the Cubs, but c’mon. Pitching AND hitting? The Cubs truly do have it all. As trendy as this pick is, it may also be the only logical one, too. But don’t sleep on the Giants, either, who may be getting hot at the right time.

3/4 Season Power Rankings

With just over three-quarters of the season in the books, it’s time to produce our last power rankings of the 2016 season, included are each team’s DailyMLB preseason ranks.

  1. Chicago Cubs (Preseason rank: 3)
  2. Washington Nationals (6)
  3. Cleveland Indians (5)
  4. Texas Rangers (8)
  5. Toronto Blue Jays (2)
  6. San Francisco Giants (7)
  7. Boston Red Sox (19)
  8. Los Angeles Dodgers (11)
  9. St. Louis Cardinals (1)
  10. Baltimore Orioles (13)
  11. Seattle Mariners (15)
  12. Houston Astros (16)
  13. Miami Marlins (14)
  14. Detroit Tigers (9)
  15. New York Mets (4)
  16. Pittsburgh Pirates (18)
  17. Kansas City Royals (10)
  18. New York Yankees (17)
  19. Colorado Rockies (22)
  20. Philadelphia Phillies (30)
  21. Chicago White Sox (20)
  22. Oakland Athletics (21)
  23. Tampa Bay Rays (25)
  24. Milwaukee Brewers (27)
  25. Los Angeles Angels (24)
  26. San Diego Padres (23)
  27. Cincinnati Reds (29)
  28. Arizona Diamondbacks (12)
  29. Minnesota Twins (26)
  30. Atlanta Braves (28)

Overall, we had a very successful preseason rankings with how the teams actually have ended up to this point.  In terms of rising or falling from the initial rankings, the biggest disappointment this year are the Arizona Diamondbacks with the biggest surprise being the Boston Red Sox (one of our only brutal mistakes during prediction season).  Most every other team is within just a few spots of where we had them, which is an incredible feat considering all the variables that baseball brings.

All Star Break Power Rankings

Time to check in on our power rankings as it stands at the All Star break.

1.) San Francisco Giants
2.) Washington Nationals
3.) Texas Rangers
4.) Chicago Cubs
5.) Cleveland Indians
6.) Baltimore Orioles
7.) Boston Red Sox
8.) Los Angeles Dodgers
9.) Toronto Blue Jays
10.) Houston Astros
11.) Miami Marlins
12.) New York Mets
13.) St. Louis Cardinals
14.) Detroit Tigers
15.) Pittsburgh Pirates
16.) Seattle Mariners
17.) Kansas City Royals
18.) Chicago White Sox
19.) New York Yankees
20.) Colorado Rockies
21.) Philadelphia Phillies
22.) Arizona Diamondbacks
23.) Oakland Athletics
24.) Milwaukee Brewers
25.) San Diego Padres
26.) Los Angeles Angels
27.) Tampa Bay Rays
28.) Minnesota Twins
29.) Cincinnati Reds
30.) Atlanta Braves